Athlete Profile - Ryan Day: A Family Affair

ATHLETE PROFILE - RYAN DAY: A FAMILY AFFAIR

For Ryan Day, becoming a triathlete was a natural progression.  A decade ago, in Ryan’s early 20s, his dad switched from running to triathlons.  Ryan was an avid supporter, including watching his dad and stepmother take part in the Ironman the last year it was held in Penticton.  It was this that motivated Ryan to being more physical activity.

Ryan had been an active a child, playing nearly every sport he could.  He played soccer for many years, as well as baseball, volleyball, and basketball.  However, we all know that childhood activities tend to stop as childhood wanes.  Once his father’s Ironman finish motivated him to get active as an adult, Ryan began running.  He also had always wanted to play hockey as a child, and he began to play in 2014.  Ryan started training for a half marathon through Running Room. There, he attended a talk on running form given by TriStars founder Bob Gebbie.  Ryan completed a full marathon in 2015.  After this, he decided to switch to triathlon.  He had heard good things about TriStars, so he decided that was where he started to begin training.

Ryan says that his number one mentors are his father and stepmother.  They are really the ones who got him into the sport.  He also knows how much work they put into their own training to finish an Ironman. 

Since joining TriStars with the Tri-Start clinic last March, Ryan has become an avid triathlon spectator.  He admires triathlete Richard Murray and counts him as a mentor.  As Ryan puts it, “The speed at which he can run and his form after the bike is just so impressive.”

When we asked Ryan what motivates him, he said he is motivated by “the TriStars community.  I am the type of person that doesn’t find it easy to get out on my own and push myself through a tough workout.  I get motivated through getting out with the group and pushing myself to keep up with everyone.   I also find motivation through reading books like Finding Ultra by Rich Roll, Eat and Run by Scott Jurek and Ironwar by Mark Fitzgerald.”

Ryan finds putting together all of pieces for a successful race the most challenging part about triathlon.  However, like for many athletes, the things that he finds challenging change as his athletic ability evolves.  According to Ryan:

Earlier this year I would have said the swim as it is my slowest of the 3 sports, but although I don’t go fast, I am to the point now that I am not worried about completing a swim, which I was last year.  So now I would just saying finding that balance of the right speed, the right nutrition, and the right training so that you can push yourself the whole race right to the finish line.
— Ryan Day

As for his successes, Ryan says that he is most proud of “working with Lindsey Millar last year and going from the Tri-Start clinic in March to the Tri for MS in May and all the way to completing my first Half-Iron distance race in Cultus Lake in September.”  He found success all season.  However, he was most proud of his first timed event.  At the Langford Triathlon, he finished 9th overall and 1st in his age category for the sprint distance race. 

Ryan currently has his sights set on an Ironman finish in Whistler this summer and is well on track to that goal.  After that?  Ryan says, “I know that I will continue on with triathlons and would love to travel to race in somewhere like Hawaii or in San Francisco for the Escape from Alcatraz but at this point I haven’t made any plans.”  Just post lots of photos, Ryan!